The End of ‘Disposable Male Chicks’ Probable

“Think occasionally of the suffering of which you spare yourself the sight.” ~ Albert Schweitzer

As a vegan, and knowing the horrific things we inflict upon countless creatures with our food choices every single day, nothing hits my mommy heart more than what we do to babies.

It’s not enough to be vegetarian to end cruelty and death upon others. With both dairy and eggs, there is this uncomfortable truth that no one is talking about, the very fact that reproductive animal products — which is what milk and eggs are — require enslavement of females only.

Sex Is A 50/50 Game

With the billions of female chicks born into the egg laying industry every year in America, an equal billions more are males. Their creation (and end) is one of profit and necessity by an industry intent upon satisfying a consumer desire for a traditional breakfast, mayonnaise, and baked goods.

These male chicks (cockerels) are an unnecessary by-product of laying hens bred to crank out menstrual cycles — eggs. Male chicks not only don’t have these cycles, they don’t even have ‘meat value.’ They are ground up or suffocated while still alive as a standard practice in the ‘egg growing’ industry that egg-eaters perpetuate.

Is this the kind of people we are in America?

Click Romani above to learn more.

Hope For Billions

Though I am no animal welfarist, reading the news that new technology may end the necessary practice of grinding baby chicks alive (for our eggs) makes me heave a sigh of relief. It’s about time the decades-long work of animal advocates like PETA and HSUS paid off.

There is still that tiny issue of enslaving others unnecessarily for our pleasure palate, but changing people’s habits is so often a slow-going process, particularly when those habits involve what we eat. But this — finding a better way than culling male babies — is a good start.

The Chick Or The Egg? How About…Neither?

My family and I have been vegan for more than 4 years now. We were all non-vegan for the decades before that, so we know how difficult it can be to take that step into the unknown. To be sure, it’s been no hardship save that the rest of the world is reluctant to come along.

And to think we don’t even need eggs to live healthy, happy lives! My whole life, Blue Plate Mayo — made in Louisiana — was my condiment of choice because of its rich, creamy taste and texture. I never knew the truth about eggs, so why change something I love to eat?

Now I know, and what I know makes me complicit in the crime. Now you know too.

We now buy Hampton Creek’s Just Mayo at our local Wal-mart. (Our grocer, Kroger, carries Hellman’s Vegan, but I would rather support a vegan company rather than an animal-use company that happens to have a vegan option.) Its taste and texture is just as amazing as my former Blue Plate, without the added cruelty. It was a $0.50 difference in price — cheaper. I had to really look for it, though; on a 10-ft by 10-ft wall of countless mayonnaise products, it was the only vegan option and located at the very bottom right of the section, tucked back. If I didn’t know what I was looking for, I might never have found it.

just_mayo

Hampton Creek Mayo
All of the taste, none of the death,
none of the cruelty, none of the cholesterol
of an egg-based mayonnaise.

Related Posts

Why continue habits that cause the unnecessary
suffering or cruelty of others?

Living with a conscience is such an easy thing to do.
Go Vegan!

5 thoughts on “The End of ‘Disposable Male Chicks’ Probable

  1. I really enjoy reading DirtNKids for its mindful approach towards discovery, learning and teaching. My best memories are layered in the best kind of dirt. Passing on the spirit of gentleness toward all creatures that must depend upon each other is key. Ever increasing exploitation of our fellow sentient beings occurs without question and without critical opposition. It is a joy to join with fellow vegans. If ever there is a best time to speak out, it is in November.

    Foul realities of chance occur when flipping a coin reveals two terrible fates for fowl: crushed into feed protein quickly or allowed to grow larger and more appealing to sate the passing crave of a misinformed palate.

    Thank you for lending your voice to a better world for all and each 🙂
    Warm wishes for all things better do I extend to all and each too, by writing down what I discovered during the 1950’s. Much dirt also covered me when a kid: https://315glenroy.wordpress.com/

    Like

    1. Thank you, Bill, for the warm comment. Of course, we both seem to agree on the gentleness of all creatures spilling over into how we treat each other as humans, race and gender aside.

      In America, November and December are the months I work the hardest by way of awareness as animal exploitation, over-consumption and waste are commonplace. I try not to be too much in-your-face — I have many friends and family following this blog! — I don’t let others’ pleasure without a conscience go unnoticed. People are inherently good, Bill, and our job as advocates will help them into living more consistently within their value system. Educating the masses is tough but rewarding work.

      It all starts with dirt. When one loves the ugly grub or slimy worm, it’s easy to love the fuzzy chick!

      Like

      1. It really *is* difficult at times to keep adrenaline in check and not to allow it to do your thinking for you. I also have friends and family following, so going over the top is something I try to avoid. Writer’s regret is best handled proactively. To continue the metaphor: let the dust and dirt settle 🙂

        Like

      2. Hi Shannon, although the quality and variety of vegan fare has increased remarkably, it is still very lonely to be a vegan in these parts too (we are in Northern KY just south of Cincinnati). But the gentle joy of veganism transcends geographical distance at the speed of electrons. So here’s to a more gentle world. Warm-heard wishes 🙂

        Like

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